Recently, I went to a “Books and Babies” event hosted by the local library. The age range for this event was 0-18 months. My daughter is in that age range so off we went.  I didn’t have any huge expectations, really. I imagined a woman reading books to a small group of children sitting quietly in a circle. I thought my daughter might enjoy it. When I read to her, she loves it. Why not do it with other babies? Right? Right.

When I arrived (2-3 minutes late because I didn’t know the location of the room) there were dozens of children sitting with their caregivers with the book reader as the main focal point in the room. I said caregiver, not to be politically correct, but because there were tons of nannies there.  The split between parents and caregivers was about 50/50. The racial make-up was 85% caucasian, 15% people of color. And of those POC, most of them were the nannies, I mentioned above. And I’m pretty sure about the nanny thing unless West Indian woman are out here adopting little white babies.

I’m new to this “stay at home mom life” so this is very new to me. I don’t know why I thought I’d run into a bunch of Black moms. Probably because we’re in Bed-Stuy….but I forgot, we’re in Bed-Stuy- the new Bed-Stuy. The local demographics are changing.

Anywhoooo, I was surprisingly taken aback by being a minority in my own ‘hood. Then I snapped directly back into focus: being a SAHM is a huuuuge privilege. So yes, the majority of women attending this event at 11am on a weekday will most likely be white and caretakers (hired by a white family)- the families notoriously known to have higher incomes; which would lend to the privilege of having a SAHparent.

After taking all this in, having my feelings and processing it, I was left with nothing but appreciation for my husband and what he does for our family. He works damn hard to make sure our family (of four) is taken care of. We want for nothing, nor does he. I am proudly a stay at home mom and the privilege of my life is not lost on me whatsoever.

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